Have You Seen Any of These?

Friday, March 31, 2017

Grey Whales, Orca, Humpbacks and Dolphins Showing Up


Seeing Transient Bigg's Orca on the mainland side of upper Georgia Strait was a real treat as they played and shared their food in front of the many vehicles that tend to stop by the shore to enjoy them. This pod has a very young calf with another juvenile that looks less than a year old. T087, an easily identified big male with a large nick at the top of his dorsal was with this pod. He had been travelling on his own last Fall which caused some concern about his wellbeing. These are social animals. These may have been the same whales seen by Campbell River in the morning.

Other Killer Whales or Orca, the terminology is interchangeable as Orca is part of their Latin name, have also been reported by Roberts Creek, in Howe Sound and up into Toba Inlet. Howe Sound has become quite active with reports of Humpback and Grey Whales, Orca and Dolphins this report. A good sign in the recovery of the area.

Susan MacKay, Wild Ocean Whale Society


Transient Bigg's Killer Whales in front of Powell River



Society News & Events

Real Time Monitoring Station Update:
The mast is up and still in need of securing a couple of pieces to the very hard steel piling. We are still working with manufacturers on sorting out the audio noise problem. Although slow in coming, this hard fought project is becoming a reality. They say the first one is the worst! It would have been wonderful to watch today's Orca from there.

Our team of Volunteers continue to do a great job in making sure all your reports are mapped and published regularly. Would you like to join us?
Review our current Volunteer Job Postings
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Sightings Update


ISSUE SIGHTINGS MAP 2017-007

ISSUE SIGHTINGS MAP


TRANSIENT BIGGS KILLER WHALES

Thu Mar 30 2017

18:17 • 6 Biggs Orca heading south towards Northeast Point on Texada Island, Malaspina Strait.


SIGHTING MEDIA
Transient Biggs Killer Whales
Transient Bigg's Killer Whales sharing food in front of Powell River
Thu, 30 Mar 2017 - 4 items





SIGHTING MEDIA
Transient Biggs Killer Whales
Transient Bigg's Killer Whales sharing food in front of Powell River
Thu, 30 Mar 2017 - 4 items


17:45 • 6 Biggs Orca heading south off Grief Point south of Powell River, Malaspina Strait. Baby in pod.
Peter Hamilton, Lifeforce

16:45 • 6-7 Biggs Orca ◦T087◦ playing, in front of Powell River Viewpoint, Malaspina Strait. A very young calf in the pod.
15:36 • 5-6 Biggs Orca heading south off Gibsons Beach just north of Powell River, Malaspina Strait. Pod includes a tiny one.
Y-Knot Sport Fishing, Powell River, BC


Fri Mar 24 2017

16:05 • est. 7 Biggs Orca moving quickly, heading south-west off Roberts Creek, Gibsons, Georgia Strait. First seen going by Roberts Creek pier just after 4 pm heading SW. Drove to Chaster Park (Gibsons) and observed 2 large orcas from the pod go by. Then drove to Gospel Rock (Gibsons) and at 5:15 pm observed the whole pod going by. Each time, they were further out in the Strait of Georgia, still heading SW. ▫ Observed from Shore
Karen Holland, Gibsons, BC



SIGHTING MEDIA
Transient Biggs Killer Whales
Seven Transient Bigg's Killer Whale heading Southwest off of Roberts Creek
Fri, 24 Mar 2017 - 2 items
Karen Holland, Gibsons, BC



SIGHTING MEDIA
Transient Biggs Killer Whales
Seven Transient Bigg's Killer Whale heading Southwest off of Roberts Creek
Fri, 24 Mar 2017 - 2 items
Karen Holland, Gibsons, BC



Tue Mar 21 2017

15:48 • 6 Biggs Orca heading south-east off Gabriola Island in False Narrows approaching Pylades Channel. One big bull in the group.
Pat Hill, Gabriola Island, BC



UNIDENTIFIED KILLER WHALES

Thu Mar 30 2017

17:45 • 5-6 Orca moving quickly, heading north-west between Lantzville and Maude Island, Georgia Strait. Taking 10 min dives and breached. Headed towards Schooner Cove. ▫ Observed from Shore
Blaine Froats, Lantzville, BC

08:43 • 5-6 Orca moving quickly, heading north off the Campbell River Fishing Pier, Discovery Passage.

Wed Mar 29 2017

17:30 • Orca heading south off Bullock Bluff at the north end of Cortes Island, Calm Channel.

Mon Mar 27 2017

18:06 • Orca in Okisollo Channel. Putting on a show.
11:00 • 5 Orca heading east by Brem River, Toba Inlet. Reported by a friend. ▫ Second Hand

Sun Mar 26 2017

16:00 • 1 Orca moving quickly, heading north-east about 500 meters off of Horseshoe Bay in West Vancouver, Queen Charlotte Channel. Seen 100 ft ahead from 20 ft commuter boat travelling from Gambier Island to Horseshoe Bay. ▫ On Scene
John Church, Gambier Island, BC


Fri Mar 24 2017

14:15 • est. 10 Orca frolicking, in Davis Bay, Sechelt, Georgia Strait.
Georgena Good, Sechelt, BC


Sun Mar 19 2017

--:-- • Orca in Toba Inlet. Observed in the afternoon. Baby Orca in the group. Observed by a friend. ▫ Second Hand


HUMPBACK WHALES

Mon Mar 06 2017

06:40 • 1 Humpback Whales heading north off Passage Island towards Howe Sound, Queen Charlotte Channel.
Philine Scholz-Mayty,



SIGHTING MEDIA
Humpback Whales
Humpback Whale heading North up Howe Sound from Passage Island
Mon, 6 Mar 2017 - 1 items
Philine Scholz-Mayty,


SIGHTING MEDIA
Humpback Whales
Humpback Whale heading North up Howe Sound from Passage Island
Mon, 6 Mar 2017 - 1 items
Philine Scholz-Mayty,




GREY WHALES

Mon Mar 27 2017

12:49 • 2 Grey Whales heading north by Lions Bay heading into Howe Sound.
Susan Davis, Lions Bay, BC



PACIFIC WHITE SIDED DOLPHINS

Mon Mar 20 2017

12:36 • 3-4 PWS Dolphins heading north off the Powell River Viewpoint, Malaspina Strait.
Michelle Pennell, Powell River, BC



SIGHTING MEDIA
Pacific White Sided Dolphins
A small group of Pacific White Sided Dolphins heading North by the Powell River Viewpoint
Mon, 20 Mar 2017 - 4 items
Michelle Pennell, Powell River, BC





SIGHTING MEDIA
Pacific White Sided Dolphins
A small group of Pacific White Sided Dolphins heading North by the Powell River Viewpoint
Mon, 20 Mar 2017 - 4 items
Michelle Pennell, Powell River, BC



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NEW! WOWs Sightings Archive Explorer

Recommended for desktop browsers and newer mobile devices

Dive into over 5,000 Cetacean Sightings, images, videos and audio recordings reported in our Sightings Updates with the WOWS Sightings Archive Explorer

ARCHIVE EXPLORER


Archive Explorer takes readers into the Cetacean world of the BC Coast. Easily view all Cetacean sighting reports together with all sighting photos and videos:
• View species such as Humpback, Grey Whale or Dalls Porpoise
• Follow the endangered Southern Residents Orca in the Salish Sea
• Search for encounters with T002C2 Tumbo
• Goto Port Alberni to watch a close-up video of Orca in the harbour
• Track the T010s Transients as they hunt and travel the inside passage
• Check-Out "KC", the ever popular Humphack and track his whereabouts this past August
• Goto one of 12,000 named locations on the BC and WA State coast
• Print custom sighting reports and maps (Coming Soon)

Explore this powerfull new research tool with the Archive Explorer Help page

ARCHIVE EXPLORER"

Note: The Cetacean Sightings Archive is also available in database format together with sighting photo and video links for viewing, query and download here

Send your Comments and Questions to: Archive Explorer Feedback


The Magazine



REGIONAL & WEST COAST


KIRO TV News, Seattle, WA



On the second day of spring, KIRO 7’s Chopper spotted a group of orca whales, swimming above and below the water.


Daily Mail, UK


The intimate moment is extra special because whales usually nurse their young deep under the water, so visibility is limited.
The extraordinary footage was shot on Silver Bank - the main calving and breeding ground for the majority of the North Atlantic humpback whale population.


One Green Planet



Video posted on Charles Harmer’s Facebook page shows a curious orca is in its natural habitat, free to engage with the human visitors for as long as the animal feels like. Could anyone ever see that much of an orca’s true nature and behavior in an aquarium? Doubtful.
This is truly how we should learn about marine mammals – in the wild.


The Stranger, Seattle, WA


In September of 2016, the oldest living orca known to science, J2, was photographed near San Juan Island from a drone. Matriarch of the southern residents, a population of killer whales that lives in Puget Sound and is unique on the planet, J2 got her name because she was the second orca to be positively identified by scientists at the Center for Whale Research on San Juan Island during the first census of southern resident killer whales, conducted in 1976. The Center for Whale Research also assigns nicknames, and because J2 was so old when scientists first identified her, the nickname she got was "Granny."

"We do not know her precise age because she was born long before our study began," Ken Balcomb, the marine mammal biologist who founded the Center for Whale Research, explained. "In 1987, we estimated that she was at least 45 years old and was more likely to have been 76 years old." By 2016, she was estimated to be somewhere from 74 to 105 years old....


UCSB, CA


Collisions have become all too frequent, as ship traffic proliferates along migratory whale routes and feeding areas. Reports of whales being struck and killed in such impacts have increased dramatically in the past 50 years.

Hoping to mitigate this growing problem, the Benioff Ocean Initiative at UC Santa Barbara has committed $1.5 million to accelerate research aimed at finding and implementing new solutions to curtail ship strikes and reduce whale mortality.


ECOWATCH



On Feb. 25, while patrolling the waters of the Gulf of California for Operation Milagro III, the M/V Sam Simon sailed through a megapod of dolphins with numbers estimated to be more than 1,000 individuals.

The elation and joy of this sight comes with the realization that many of these dolphins' lives will be cut short due to illegal gill nets. Sea Shepherd will stay in the Gulf of California until we pull out every last illegal gill net, ensuring the safety of the inhabitants who call these waters home....


Metro News, BC


The iconic humpback whale has been the subject of thousands of scientific papers.
But it took nearly a decade for researchers in B.C. to discover something completely unexpected about the cetaceans’ seasonal movements up and down the province’s coast.
In large numbers as they migrate, humpbacks repeatedly return to certain habitats in what the researchers compared to a previously undetected “wave” pattern, according to the newly published study in the marine science journal Marine Ecology Progress Series.
And it turns out that humpbacks may be picking their favourite coastal fjords not just based on food supply, but also how well the whales’ singing sounds and how good they are for socializing, according to their thousands of hours of observations.


Globe & Mail, BC


They are some of the largest animals on Earth, and it would seem difficult not to spot them. But the greatest threat to the whales that ply the Pacific Ocean is the increasing vessel traffic that traverses what has become a marine superhighway.
A vessel strike is the most likely suspect in the death last December of an endangered killer whale found off the Sunshine Coast, north of Vancouver.
Now vessel operators have a new tool that could help them avoid whale collisions off the West Coast.
Scientists at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have developed a program to predict where whales will be, giving vessel operators a greater chance to avoid collision.
“By the time you see a whale, it’s almost too late; and it’s probably the whale you don’t see, that’s just below the surface, that’s likely to get hit,” said Helen Bailey, WhaleWatch project leader at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.
Using decades of satellite-tracking data gathered ..


CANADA


The Guardian, UK


“These creatures are in the frontline of change in the Arctic and it is clear they are having to make considerable changes in behaviour to survive, fishing further and further into open water,” he says. “We need to find out urgently how significant are these changes.”

At the heart of the issue lies a shortage of algae on Arctic sea ice. At this time of year algae forms on the underside of floes, as spring begins in the far north. The algae is then eaten by tiny creatures called zooplankton, and they in turn are consumed by fish that are in turn eaten by seals. Later, as the season continues and the weather warms, sea ice melts and algae sinks to the sea bed, where it nourishes a different food chain. It is consumed by worms and other simple organisms on the sea floor, and these are consumed by benthic fish – fish that live on the sea floor or near it, such as the Greenland halibut. These are then eaten by Beluga whales.


INTERNATIONAL


The Guardian, UK


While observing sperm whales off the Sri Lankan coast, Philip Hoare came face to face with eight hunting orcas who had no fear of the 100-strong sperm whale pod ...

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you or your organization must be authors of the work and are solely responsible for its content. the magazine gives no assurance material submitted will be published. media submission guidelines


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Friday, March 17, 2017

Orca, Humpbacks, Dolphins and Group of Harbour Porpoise

Fleeting glimpses through inclement weather of cetacean species provides us with a short sightings report this issue. The report still manages to cover Orca, Humpback Whales, Pacific White Sided Dolphins and a large group of Harbour Porpoise. The whales, dolphins and porpoise are out there, but have not been easy to spot. We are overdue for better weather.

We received a correction note to our last report: The Feb 16th sighting off Gabriola of Southern Resident Killer Whales were in fact 9 Transient Bigg's as noted in this issue. Southern Resident Orca are not likely to be in the same area as Transient Bigg's, but it does happen on ocassion. We welcome all sightings information and publish the information we receive. Figuring out who is who in this big ocean can be challenging at times. The more reports and photo submissions we receive, the more accurately we can record the information, so please keep your reports coming.

Susan MacKay, Wild Ocean Whale Society


Some playful Pacific White Sided Dolphins enjoying the summer



Society News & Events

Real Time Monitoring Station Update:
The replacement part has been tested and works great together with the camera, but we have yet another delay with audio noise coming from the camera overriding any hydrophone audio. Yet another delay as we work with the manufacturer to resolve this issue. This truly is a hard fought project, but they say the first one is the worst!

Our team of Volunteers continue to do a great job in making sure all your reports are mapped and published regularly. Would you like to join us?
Review our current Volunteer Job Postings
Note to Safari browser users:
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Sightings Update


ISSUE SIGHTINGS MAP 2017-006

ISSUE SIGHTINGS MAP


TRANSIENT BIGGS KILLER WHALES

Thu Feb 16 2017

--:-- • 9 Biggs Orca hunting and socializing, heading north-east between Entrance Island and Gabriola Island, Georgia Strait. Observed in the morning. This is an update to the Orca sighting reported in the previous publication released March 4th (Issue 2017-005). ▫ From Power or Sail Boat
James Pilkington, Nanaimo, BC



SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Transient Biggs Killer Whales
Bigg's Transient Killer Whale T40 "Captain Hook" from the summer
Fri, 10 Mar 2017 - 1 items


SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Transient Biggs Killer Whales
Bigg's Transient Killer Whale T40 "Captain Hook" from the summer
Fri, 10 Mar 2017 - 1 items




UNIDENTIFIED KILLER WHALES

Sun Mar 12 2017

15:45 • Orca between Duke Point and Tsawwassen, Georgia Strait. Large pod observed from a young individual on the Ferry. ▫ Second Hand
Peter Hamilton, Lifeforce


Sat Mar 04 2017

17:16 • 6 Orca playing, heading north off Grief Point in the middle of Malaspina Strait. Two males, 3 females, and one baby.
Anne and Ron Baker, Powell River, BC


Fri Mar 03 2017

10:26 • Orca in front of Whaletown on the west side of Cortes Island, Sutil Channel. ▫ Second Hand

Mon Feb 20 2017

17:30 • est. 3-4 Orca moving quickly, heading north off the west side of Campbell Island in the middle of Raymond Passage. Pointy dorsal fins. Seen while fishing from speedboat; appeared to be on the move as I glazed them on southern horizon and within 15 min they were west of us. ▫ On Scene
Vic Gladish, Bella Bella, BC



SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Unidentified Killer Whales
Mother and calf Killer Whale travelling together in the summer
Fri, 10 Mar 2017 - 1 items


SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Unidentified Killer Whales
Mother and calf Killer Whale travelling together in the summer
Fri, 10 Mar 2017 - 1 items




SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Unidentified Killer Whales
Killer Whale spyhopping during the summer months
Thu, 16 Mar 2017 - 1 items


SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Unidentified Killer Whales
Killer Whale spyhopping during the summer months
Thu, 16 Mar 2017 - 1 items




HUMPBACK WHALES

Thu Mar 16 2017

11:34 • 1 Humpback Whales heading west off Doctor Islets, Knight Inlet.
11:01 • 1 Humpback Whales heading west abeam Village Island, Knight Inlet.

Fri Mar 10 2017

--:-- • 1 Humpback Whales in the fishing grounds in Denman Island, Georgia Strait. Fishermen talked about a couple of Humpbacks yesterday too.
Radio, overheard or call out



PACIFIC WHITE SIDED DOLPHINS

Wed Mar 15 2017

14:38 • est. 20 PWS Dolphins heading north just off the Powell River Ferry terminal, Malaspina Strait. Heading towards the Powell River mill.
Barry Rice, Powell River, BC


Tue Mar 07 2017

13:35 • PWS Dolphins moving quickly, heading south off Myrtle Rocks south of Powell River, Malaspina Strait. They are too far out, near the island to identify, but very many and fast!. ▫ Observed from Shore
Christie Close, Mill Valley, CA, USA



SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Pacific White Sided Dolphins
Two Pacific White Sided Dolphins playing together in the summer
Fri, 10 Mar 2017 - 1 items


SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Pacific White Sided Dolphins
Two Pacific White Sided Dolphins playing together in the summer
Fri, 10 Mar 2017 - 1 items




HARBOUR PORPOISE

Wed Mar 15 2017

14:00 • 2 Harbour Porpoise in Kanish Bay.

Sun Mar 05 2017

12:02 • 20 Harbour Porpoise milling, about 200-300 meters off Stories Beach south of Campbell River, Georgia Strait.

SUBMIT sightings
or call 1-877-323-9776 or eMail
we welcome your sighting reports, photographs, video and audio recordings. please review our media submission guidelines



Jump to:   MAP | SIGHTINGS | MAGAZINE

NEW! WOWs Sightings Archive Explorer

Recommended for desktop browsers and newer mobile devices

Dive into over 5,000 Cetacean Sightings, images, videos and audio recordings reported in our Sightings Updates with the WOWS Sightings Archive Explorer

ARCHIVE EXPLORER


Archive Explorer takes readers into the Cetacean world of the BC Coast. Easily view all Cetacean sighting reports together with all sighting photos and videos:
• View species such as Humpback, Grey Whale or Dalls Porpoise
• Follow the endangered Southern Residents Orca in the Salish Sea
• Search for encounters with T002C2 Tumbo
• Goto Port Alberni to watch a close-up video of Orca in the harbour
• Track the T010s Transients as they hunt and travel the inside passage
• Check-Out "KC", the ever popular Humphack and track his whereabouts this past August
• Goto one of 12,000 named locations on the BC and WA State coast
• Print custom sighting reports and maps (Coming Soon)

Explore this powerfull new research tool with the Archive Explorer Help page

ARCHIVE EXPLORER"

Note: The Cetacean Sightings Archive is also available in database format together with sighting photo and video links for viewing, query and download here

Send your Comments and Questions to: Archive Explorer Feedback


The Magazine



REGIONAL & WEST COAST


Times-Colonist, Victoria, BC


The Canadian Coast Guard is responding after up to 178 litres of diesel spilled near a protected killer whale habitat off northern Vancouver Island.

A citizen reported fuel on the beach and in the water near Port Harvey Marina, across Johnstone Strait from Vancouver Island and about 25 kilometres from Robson Bight Ecological Reserve.

The marina is closed for the season.

The spill was initially reported at up to 1,100 litres, based on the capacity of the fuel tank from which it came. The estimate was reduced after Transport Canada flew over the area.


CBC - BC


A decade of observation in a fjord on B.C.'s North Coast has uncovered an intriguing pattern among the thriving humpback whales that feed there each summer.

Researchers call it a "whale wave," in a peer-reviewed study published this week in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series.

Each year, as hundreds of humpbacks arrive in the Kitimat fjord system, near Hartley Bay, B.C., they follow a seasonal pattern, as observed in visual surveys by the Gitga'at First Nation and North Coast Cetacean Society.

The whales start in outer waters and move into the inlet and Douglas Channel — but it's not clear why....


CBC-BC


Three underwater robots spent weeks listening to grey whales off the west coast of Vancouver Island last month, so scientists can learn more about what the whales are doing in northern waters.

The two-metre long yellow gliders travelled together in underwater canyons over the continental shelf near Clayoquot Sound.

"They're like torpedoes with little wings," said Richard Dewey, Associate Director of Science Services for Ocean Networks Canada.

"They're measuring sea water temperature, but they had ...


CTV - Vancouver, BC

For better or worse, the era of live cetaceans at the Vancouver Aquarium appears to be coming to an end.
On Thursday night, following two days of passionate debate from dozens of speakers, the Vancouver Park Board voted unanimously to move toward banning the importation or display of whales, dolphins and porpoises at the popular Stanley Park attraction.
Staff members have been asked to present a draft bylaw amendment to facilitate the change by May 15.


INTERNATIONAL


Gizmodo



Sightings of True’s beaked whales are so rare that even the most devoted whale expert can go an entire career without ever seeing one in the wild. Researchers working near the Azores are now the first to ever capture underwater footage of these aquatic creatures in their natural habitat.

The new footage, captured by a research team ...


Phys.org


A new study involving biologists from Monash University Australia has found that despite their very different ancestors, dolphins and crocodiles evolved similarly-shaped skulls to feed on similar prey.

Dolphins and crocodiles now live in rivers and oceans, but each evolved from land-based animals. Feeding in water has many new challenges. This new study shows that despite being separated by 300 million years, dolphins and crocodiles found comparable solutions to these problems, and evolved skull shapes that are remarkably similar ...


Gizmodo


Researchers observed 22 instances of humpback whales gathering in never-before-seen groups of 20 to 200 whales, on three separate trips off the southwest coast of South Africa. The study’s authors write that such large aggregations haven’t been recorded on prior research trips except for one sighting of 20 whales, which was more likely a number of smaller groups. Changes in the whales’ prey, or a growing population, might be leading to the new behavior. Or maybe the whales are plotting to take down humanity.

“It’s quite unusual to see them in such large groups,” G√≠sli Vikingsson, head of whale research at the Marine and Freshwater Research Institute in Iceland told New Scientist...

Magazine Submissions

the magazine accepts submissions of links to published articles and media of interest to our readers. we welcome original articles, letters, notices, photography, video and audio


SUBMIT
to the magazine





original material guidelines
notices: 100 words max.; letters & articles: 500 words max.
you or your organization must be authors of the work and are solely responsible for its content. the magazine gives no assurance material submitted will be published. media submission guidelines


DONATE
to the non profit wild ocean whale society

VOLUNTEER
review our volunteer opportunities

SUBMIT sightings
or call 1-877-323-9776 or eMail
we welcome your sighting reports, photographs, video and audio recordings. please review our media submission guidelines



Jump to:   MAP | SIGHTINGS | MAGAZINE


SUBSCRIBE
receive sightings update eMail notices

CONTACT
the wild ocean whale society