Have You Seen Any of These?

Friday, March 17, 2017

Orca, Humpbacks, Dolphins and Group of Harbour Porpoise

Fleeting glimpses through inclement weather of cetacean species provides us with a short sightings report this issue. The report still manages to cover Orca, Humpback Whales, Pacific White Sided Dolphins and a large group of Harbour Porpoise. The whales, dolphins and porpoise are out there, but have not been easy to spot. We are overdue for better weather.

We received a correction note to our last report: The Feb 16th sighting off Gabriola of Southern Resident Killer Whales were in fact 9 Transient Bigg's as noted in this issue. Southern Resident Orca are not likely to be in the same area as Transient Bigg's, but it does happen on ocassion. We welcome all sightings information and publish the information we receive. Figuring out who is who in this big ocean can be challenging at times. The more reports and photo submissions we receive, the more accurately we can record the information, so please keep your reports coming.

Susan MacKay, Wild Ocean Whale Society


Some playful Pacific White Sided Dolphins enjoying the summer



Society News & Events

Real Time Monitoring Station Update:
The replacement part has been tested and works great together with the camera, but we have yet another delay with audio noise coming from the camera overriding any hydrophone audio. Yet another delay as we work with the manufacturer to resolve this issue. This truly is a hard fought project, but they say the first one is the worst!

Our team of Volunteers continue to do a great job in making sure all your reports are mapped and published regularly. Would you like to join us?
Review our current Volunteer Job Postings
Note to Safari browser users:
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Sightings Update


ISSUE SIGHTINGS MAP 2017-006

ISSUE SIGHTINGS MAP


TRANSIENT BIGGS KILLER WHALES

Thu Feb 16 2017

--:-- • 9 Biggs Orca hunting and socializing, heading north-east between Entrance Island and Gabriola Island, Georgia Strait. Observed in the morning. This is an update to the Orca sighting reported in the previous publication released March 4th (Issue 2017-005). ▫ From Power or Sail Boat
James Pilkington, Nanaimo, BC



SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Transient Biggs Killer Whales
Bigg's Transient Killer Whale T40 "Captain Hook" from the summer
Fri, 10 Mar 2017 - 1 items


SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Transient Biggs Killer Whales
Bigg's Transient Killer Whale T40 "Captain Hook" from the summer
Fri, 10 Mar 2017 - 1 items




UNIDENTIFIED KILLER WHALES

Sun Mar 12 2017

15:45 • Orca between Duke Point and Tsawwassen, Georgia Strait. Large pod observed from a young individual on the Ferry. ▫ Second Hand
Peter Hamilton, Lifeforce


Sat Mar 04 2017

17:16 • 6 Orca playing, heading north off Grief Point in the middle of Malaspina Strait. Two males, 3 females, and one baby.
Anne and Ron Baker, Powell River, BC


Fri Mar 03 2017

10:26 • Orca in front of Whaletown on the west side of Cortes Island, Sutil Channel. ▫ Second Hand

Mon Feb 20 2017

17:30 • est. 3-4 Orca moving quickly, heading north off the west side of Campbell Island in the middle of Raymond Passage. Pointy dorsal fins. Seen while fishing from speedboat; appeared to be on the move as I glazed them on southern horizon and within 15 min they were west of us. ▫ On Scene
Vic Gladish, Bella Bella, BC



SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Unidentified Killer Whales
Mother and calf Killer Whale travelling together in the summer
Fri, 10 Mar 2017 - 1 items


SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Unidentified Killer Whales
Mother and calf Killer Whale travelling together in the summer
Fri, 10 Mar 2017 - 1 items




SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Unidentified Killer Whales
Killer Whale spyhopping during the summer months
Thu, 16 Mar 2017 - 1 items


SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Unidentified Killer Whales
Killer Whale spyhopping during the summer months
Thu, 16 Mar 2017 - 1 items




HUMPBACK WHALES

Thu Mar 16 2017

11:34 • 1 Humpback Whales heading west off Doctor Islets, Knight Inlet.
11:01 • 1 Humpback Whales heading west abeam Village Island, Knight Inlet.

Fri Mar 10 2017

--:-- • 1 Humpback Whales in the fishing grounds in Denman Island, Georgia Strait. Fishermen talked about a couple of Humpbacks yesterday too.
Radio, overheard or call out



PACIFIC WHITE SIDED DOLPHINS

Wed Mar 15 2017

14:38 • est. 20 PWS Dolphins heading north just off the Powell River Ferry terminal, Malaspina Strait. Heading towards the Powell River mill.
Barry Rice, Powell River, BC


Tue Mar 07 2017

13:35 • PWS Dolphins moving quickly, heading south off Myrtle Rocks south of Powell River, Malaspina Strait. They are too far out, near the island to identify, but very many and fast!. ▫ Observed from Shore
Christie Close, Mill Valley, CA, USA



SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Pacific White Sided Dolphins
Two Pacific White Sided Dolphins playing together in the summer
Fri, 10 Mar 2017 - 1 items


SPECIES SUPPLEMENT
Pacific White Sided Dolphins
Two Pacific White Sided Dolphins playing together in the summer
Fri, 10 Mar 2017 - 1 items




HARBOUR PORPOISE

Wed Mar 15 2017

14:00 • 2 Harbour Porpoise in Kanish Bay.

Sun Mar 05 2017

12:02 • 20 Harbour Porpoise milling, about 200-300 meters off Stories Beach south of Campbell River, Georgia Strait.

SUBMIT sightings
or call 1-877-323-9776 or eMail
we welcome your sighting reports, photographs, video and audio recordings. please review our media submission guidelines



Jump to:   MAP | SIGHTINGS | MAGAZINE

NEW! WOWs Sightings Archive Explorer

Recommended for desktop browsers and newer mobile devices

Dive into over 5,000 Cetacean Sightings, images, videos and audio recordings reported in our Sightings Updates with the WOWS Sightings Archive Explorer

ARCHIVE EXPLORER


Archive Explorer takes readers into the Cetacean world of the BC Coast. Easily view all Cetacean sighting reports together with all sighting photos and videos:
• View species such as Humpback, Grey Whale or Dalls Porpoise
• Follow the endangered Southern Residents Orca in the Salish Sea
• Search for encounters with T002C2 Tumbo
• Goto Port Alberni to watch a close-up video of Orca in the harbour
• Track the T010s Transients as they hunt and travel the inside passage
• Check-Out "KC", the ever popular Humphack and track his whereabouts this past August
• Goto one of 12,000 named locations on the BC and WA State coast
• Print custom sighting reports and maps (Coming Soon)

Explore this powerfull new research tool with the Archive Explorer Help page

ARCHIVE EXPLORER"

Note: The Cetacean Sightings Archive is also available in database format together with sighting photo and video links for viewing, query and download here

Send your Comments and Questions to: Archive Explorer Feedback


The Magazine



REGIONAL & WEST COAST


Times-Colonist, Victoria, BC


The Canadian Coast Guard is responding after up to 178 litres of diesel spilled near a protected killer whale habitat off northern Vancouver Island.

A citizen reported fuel on the beach and in the water near Port Harvey Marina, across Johnstone Strait from Vancouver Island and about 25 kilometres from Robson Bight Ecological Reserve.

The marina is closed for the season.

The spill was initially reported at up to 1,100 litres, based on the capacity of the fuel tank from which it came. The estimate was reduced after Transport Canada flew over the area.


CBC - BC


A decade of observation in a fjord on B.C.'s North Coast has uncovered an intriguing pattern among the thriving humpback whales that feed there each summer.

Researchers call it a "whale wave," in a peer-reviewed study published this week in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series.

Each year, as hundreds of humpbacks arrive in the Kitimat fjord system, near Hartley Bay, B.C., they follow a seasonal pattern, as observed in visual surveys by the Gitga'at First Nation and North Coast Cetacean Society.

The whales start in outer waters and move into the inlet and Douglas Channel — but it's not clear why....


CBC-BC


Three underwater robots spent weeks listening to grey whales off the west coast of Vancouver Island last month, so scientists can learn more about what the whales are doing in northern waters.

The two-metre long yellow gliders travelled together in underwater canyons over the continental shelf near Clayoquot Sound.

"They're like torpedoes with little wings," said Richard Dewey, Associate Director of Science Services for Ocean Networks Canada.

"They're measuring sea water temperature, but they had ...


CTV - Vancouver, BC

For better or worse, the era of live cetaceans at the Vancouver Aquarium appears to be coming to an end.
On Thursday night, following two days of passionate debate from dozens of speakers, the Vancouver Park Board voted unanimously to move toward banning the importation or display of whales, dolphins and porpoises at the popular Stanley Park attraction.
Staff members have been asked to present a draft bylaw amendment to facilitate the change by May 15.


INTERNATIONAL


Gizmodo



Sightings of True’s beaked whales are so rare that even the most devoted whale expert can go an entire career without ever seeing one in the wild. Researchers working near the Azores are now the first to ever capture underwater footage of these aquatic creatures in their natural habitat.

The new footage, captured by a research team ...


Phys.org


A new study involving biologists from Monash University Australia has found that despite their very different ancestors, dolphins and crocodiles evolved similarly-shaped skulls to feed on similar prey.

Dolphins and crocodiles now live in rivers and oceans, but each evolved from land-based animals. Feeding in water has many new challenges. This new study shows that despite being separated by 300 million years, dolphins and crocodiles found comparable solutions to these problems, and evolved skull shapes that are remarkably similar ...


Gizmodo


Researchers observed 22 instances of humpback whales gathering in never-before-seen groups of 20 to 200 whales, on three separate trips off the southwest coast of South Africa. The study’s authors write that such large aggregations haven’t been recorded on prior research trips except for one sighting of 20 whales, which was more likely a number of smaller groups. Changes in the whales’ prey, or a growing population, might be leading to the new behavior. Or maybe the whales are plotting to take down humanity.

“It’s quite unusual to see them in such large groups,” GĂ­sli Vikingsson, head of whale research at the Marine and Freshwater Research Institute in Iceland told New Scientist...

Magazine Submissions

the magazine accepts submissions of links to published articles and media of interest to our readers. we welcome original articles, letters, notices, photography, video and audio


SUBMIT
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original material guidelines
notices: 100 words max.; letters & articles: 500 words max.
you or your organization must be authors of the work and are solely responsible for its content. the magazine gives no assurance material submitted will be published. media submission guidelines


DONATE
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VOLUNTEER
review our volunteer opportunities

SUBMIT sightings
or call 1-877-323-9776 or eMail
we welcome your sighting reports, photographs, video and audio recordings. please review our media submission guidelines



Jump to:   MAP | SIGHTINGS | MAGAZINE


SUBSCRIBE
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Saturday, March 4, 2017

Minke Whales, Orca, Dolphins, Porpoise and Breaching Humpback

Minke Whales are a species throughout our coastal waters, but not often seen as they transit inside waters. Their streamlined body allows them to travel great distances after a couple of breaths making them harder to spot, so it's great to have reports on them. Southern Resident Orca seem to be staying below Nanaimo in our inner waters while a number of Unidentified Orca, most likely Transient Bigg's have been spotted above. Humpback Whales are still around but only one was seen in spectacular form closer to the more populated areas close to Port McNeill. We still have a number of Pacific White Sided Dolphins travelling around the center Georgia Strait area and some small Harbour Porpoise are back to foraging in areas off West Vancouver and Texada where they were regularly seen.

Susan MacKay, Wild Ocean Whale Society


Humpback Whale breaching off of Haddington Island
Darryl Luscombe, Sointula, BC



Society News & Events

Real Time Monitoring Station Update:
We just received the replacement defective part we tested prior to mounting the camera and are testing again. Progress has been riddled with delays, but we can see the light at the end of this hard fought project. Photos will be in our next issue.

Our team of Volunteers continue to do a great job in making sure all your reports are mapped and published regularly. Would you like to join us?
Review our current Volunteer Job Postings
Note to Safari browser users:
Apple software upgrades may prevent images from displaying on this site. To resolve the problem, please clear your Safari browser cache: On a Mac this is in Safari preferences. On iPad and iPhones, use the Settings app, Safari, Clear History and Website Data.




DONATE
to the non profit wild ocean whale society

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Sightings Update


ISSUE SIGHTINGS MAP 2017-005

ISSUE SIGHTINGS MAP


SOUTHERN RESIDENT KILLER WHALES

Thu Feb 16 2017

08:29 • 5-10 SRKW Orca foraging, heading north-east between Entrance Island and Gabriola Island, Georgia Strait. Feeding, then moving on fairly slowly. Maybe foraging. After watching them for an hour, what appears to be a research boat pursued them and stayed with the male who changed course. The boat then proceeded to the rest of the pod and they resumed heading N-E. I was able to spot them and the boat about 20 kms off shore about an hour after that. ▫ Observed from Shore
Elsa Bluethner, Gabriola Island, BC



UNIDENTIFIED KILLER WHALES

Sat Feb 25 2017

08:34 • 4 Orca near Blubber Bay on Texada Island, Malaspina Strait.
Michelle Pennell, Powell River, BC



SIGHTING MEDIA
Unidentified Killer Whales
Four Unidentified Killer Whales near Blubber Bay on Texada Island
Sat, 25 Feb 2017 - 1 items
Michelle Pennell, Powell River, BC


SIGHTING MEDIA
Unidentified Killer Whales
Four Unidentified Killer Whales near Blubber Bay on Texada Island
Sat, 25 Feb 2017 - 1 items
Michelle Pennell, Powell River, BC



Thu Feb 23 2017

11:00 • est. 4 Orca heading south by Harwood Island Spit, Malaspina Strait.
Michelle Pennell, Powell River, BC



SIGHTING MEDIA
Unidentified Killer Whales
Four Unidentified Killer Whales heading South by Hardwood Island Spit
Thu, 23 Feb 2017 - 2 items
Michelle Pennell, Powell River, BC



SIGHTING MEDIA
Unidentified Killer Whales
Four Unidentified Killer Whales heading South by Hardwood Island Spit
Thu, 23 Feb 2017 - 2 items
Michelle Pennell, Powell River, BC



Wed Feb 22 2017

17:10 • 5 Orca travelling, heading north near Black (Albion) Point, Powell River, Malaspina Strait. Travelling two ahead, two in the middle and one bringing up the rear. ▫ Second Hand
Ed & Carolynn Haggarty, Powell River, BC


Tue Feb 21 2017

--:-- • Orca in Sargeant Bay west of Sechelt, Georgia Strait. ▫ Second Hand
Gabe and Sherril Torok, Sechelt, BC


Mon Feb 20 2017

12:58 • est. 3 Orca towards Powell River Mill (Pulp & Paper), Malaspina Strait.
Michelle Pennell, Powell River, BC


Sat Feb 18 2017

16:10 • 7 Orca travelling, heading east near Mitlenatch Island, Georgia Strait. Two big fins in the group. ▫ On Scene

Wed Feb 15 2017

14:40 • 5 Orca moving slowly and taking 5 minute dives, off Dick Island near Shelter Point, Georgia Strait. Whales on site just off Shelter Pt on Texada Island from 3pm until dark. They stayed in a small area mostly on the surface but at times diving for up to 5 minutes. ▫ Observed from Shore
Jim Johnson, Texada Island, BC



SIGHTING MEDIA
Unidentified Killer Whales
Unidentified Killer Whales off of Dick Island in Georgia Strait
Wed, 15 Feb 2017 - 4 items
Jim Johnson, Texada Island, BC





SIGHTING MEDIA
Unidentified Killer Whales
Unidentified Killer Whales off of Dick Island in Georgia Strait
Wed, 15 Feb 2017 - 4 items
Jim Johnson, Texada Island, BC



Mon Feb 13 2017

15:30 • 8 Orca hunting, heading south off Lighthouse Park in West Vancouver, Burrard Inlet. From our residence located above Marine Drive overlooking Stearman beach, we spotted two groups of 4 on B.C. Family Day at approximately 1530 hours. Spotted first group of 4 including large male and one young whale at lighthouse point. They travelled south towards Stearman Beach, went alongside an anchored ship and on towards Dundarave area. The group travelled slowly blowing regularly. The second group of four was further out between Lighthouse point and UBC. They were in view for approximately 20-30 mins. Mainly visible at that distance by their distinct blows. No breaches but first groups' dorsal fins and tops quite visible from shore. Male dorsal fin was quite large. ▫ Observed from Shore
Mike Franczak, West Vancouver, BC



HUMPBACK WHALES

Wed Feb 22 2017

15:20 • 1 Humpback Whales breaching, heading west between Haddington Island and Nimpkish River, Broughton Strait. I first noticed the whale breaching near the Nimpkish Estuary. It stayed in roughly the same spot for about 15 minutes, continually breaching until it started to move slowly west towards Hyde Creek. Its behaviour was unusual (at least for me). It would come to the surface, blow and then breach. It did this continually for the next 30-40 minutes until I lost sight of the animal when it moved behind Haddington Island. ▫ Observed from Shore
Darryl Luscombe, Sointula, BC



SIGHTING MEDIA
Humpback Whales
Humpback Whale breaching between Haddington Island and Nimpkish River
Wed, 22 Feb 2017 - 2 items
Darryl Luscombe, Sointula, BC



SIGHTING MEDIA
Humpback Whales
Humpback Whale breaching between Haddington Island and Nimpkish River
Wed, 22 Feb 2017 - 2 items
Darryl Luscombe, Sointula, BC



Fri Feb 17 2017

13:02 • 1 Humpback Whales off of Favada Point on Texada Island, Georgia Strait.
Eric Green, Powell River CCG



MINKE WHALES

Sat Feb 25 2017

08:00 • 3 Minke Whales playing, heading north close to Lantzville, Georgia Strait. Two adults and one calf around sea lions very close to shore. ▫ Observed from Shore
Adrienne Baker, Lantzville, BC

08:00 • 2-3 Minke Whales heading north past Sebastian Beach, Lantzville, Georgia Strait. Watched as they rounded the point and headed into Nanoose Bay with last sighting at around 9 am.
Anette Thingsted, Lantzville, BC



PACIFIC WHITE SIDED DOLPHINS

Thu Feb 23 2017

11:15 • PWS Dolphins by Sliammon, Malaspina Strait.
Michelle Pennell, Powell River, BC


Sat Feb 18 2017

17:00 • 30-50 PWS Dolphins travelling, heading south in-shore side of Marshall Point south-west of Blubber Bay, Georgia Strait. Stopped for dinner by Marshall Rocks. ▫ Observed from Shore
Sherri Wretham, Powell River, BC

14:00 • est. 50 PWS Dolphins moving quickly, off of Little River by Comox, Georgia Strait. ▫ Observed from Shore
Janet Hutchinson, Comox, BC


Fri Feb 17 2017

16:59 • est. 20 PWS Dolphins heading north off Powell River Viewpoint, Malaspina Strait. ▫ Observed from Shore
Susie Rice, Powell River, BC

09:56 • est. 20 PWS Dolphins heading south off Powell River Viewpoint.
Michelle Pennell, Powell River, BC



SIGHTING MEDIA
Pacific White Sided Dolphins
About 20 Pacific White Sided Dolphins heading South off of the Powell River Viewpoint
Fri, 17 Feb 2017 - 7 items
Michelle Pennell, Powell River, BC








SIGHTING MEDIA
Pacific White Sided Dolphins
About 20 Pacific White Sided Dolphins heading South off of the Powell River Viewpoint
Fri, 17 Feb 2017 - 7 items
Michelle Pennell, Powell River, BC




HARBOUR PORPOISE

Wed Mar 01 2017

15:31 • 6 Harbour Porpoise foraging, by Cox Lagoon on the west side of Texada Island, Georgia Strait.
Micheline Macauley, Texada Island, BC



SIGHTING MEDIA
Harbour Porpoise
Harbour Porpoise By Cox's Lagoon on Texada Island
Wed, 1 Mar 2017 - 3 items
Micheline Macauley, Texada Island, BC




SIGHTING MEDIA
Harbour Porpoise
Harbour Porpoise By Cox's Lagoon on Texada Island
Wed, 1 Mar 2017 - 3 items
Micheline Macauley, Texada Island, BC



Fri Feb 24 2017

16:46 • est. 6 Harbour Porpoise travelling, heading north Whytecliff, West Vancouver, Queen Charlotte Channel. Pod was observed for 10 minutes. Two porpoises surfacing every couple of minutes. The other four porpoises surfaced at about 4-5 minute intervals. ▫ Observed from Shore
Ivan Ng, North Vancouver, BC



SPECIES UNSURE

Thu Feb 23 2017

14:30 • 1 Species Unsure moving slowly, Deep Cove, North Saanich, Saanich Inlet. Seen from shore. Staying around Wain Rock. Has blow hole. Small triangular dorsal fin. Seems bigger than a porpoise, guessing 10-12 feet. Solid dark colour. Was closer to shore but now by Wain rock. ▫ Observed from Shore
Bev Ripley, North Saanich, BC


SUBMIT sightings
or call 1-877-323-9776 or eMail
we welcome your sighting reports, photographs, video and audio recordings. please review our media submission guidelines



Jump to:   MAP | SIGHTINGS | MAGAZINE

NEW! WOWs Sightings Archive Explorer

Recommended for desktop browsers and newer mobile devices

Dive into over 5,000 Cetacean Sightings, images, videos and audio recordings reported in our Sightings Updates with the WOWS Sightings Archive Explorer

ARCHIVE EXPLORER


Archive Explorer takes readers into the Cetacean world of the BC Coast. Easily view all Cetacean sighting reports together with all sighting photos and videos:
• View species such as Humpback, Grey Whale or Dalls Porpoise
• Follow the endangered Southern Residents Orca in the Salish Sea
• Search for encounters with T002C2 Tumbo
• Goto Port Alberni to watch a close-up video of Orca in the harbour
• Track the T010s Transients as they hunt and travel the inside passage
• Check-Out "KC", the ever popular Humphack and track his whereabouts this past August
• Goto one of 12,000 named locations on the BC and WA State coast
• Print custom sighting reports and maps (Coming Soon)

Explore this powerfull new research tool with the Archive Explorer Help page

ARCHIVE EXPLORER"

Note: The Cetacean Sightings Archive is also available in database format together with sighting photo and video links for viewing, query and download here

Send your Comments and Questions to: Archive Explorer Feedback


The Magazine



REGIONAL & WEST COAST



Video: Orcas appear in Vancouver's harbour

The Straight, BC



The revival of marine mammals off the B.C. coast has been one of the most positive environmental stories in years.

There have been spottings of Pacific white-sided dolphins, sea otters, and humpback whales in places where they had never been seen for decades.

While the "sixth extinction" is taking place in the Anthropocene Epoch and warrants much attention, there is good news taking place in some temperate regions.

In 2010, the Raincoast Conservation Society released a report chronicling more than 120 species of marine birds along the coast, including giant albatrosses.

And earlier this month, Sauder School of Business professor James Tansey filmed orcas in Vancouver's harbour. You can see them in the video below.


Times Colonist, BC

I am opposed to the proposed “whale protection zone” on the west side of San Juan Island, due to its discrimination against commercial whale-watchers, the people who work tirelessly to educate and do everything in our power to protect our southern resident killer whales (“Push on for orca-protection zone in Haro Strait habitat,” Feb. 5).

Over the past 30 years, the commercial whale-watching industry has taken out five million people on all kinds of vessels to watch seals, sea lions, porpoises, dolphins, minke, humpback and grey whales, transient orca, birds, even wolves and deer, and of course, the focus of this petition, the southern resident killer whales.

Unfortunately, the organizer of this ...


Alaska Dispatch News, AK


For the first time since commercial whalers of past centuries were killing them — legally or illegally — there is now comprehensive accounting of whale abundance in the Gulf of Alaska.

New data about abundance and distribution shows that the Gulf of Alaska is important habitat for whales and porpoises, including some species that are extremely rare and others that are now thriving, more than three decades after international commercial whaling ended.

The results, in a study by scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration published in the journal Marine Biology, is the product of extensive surveys ....


INTERNATIONAL


The West Australian, AU


Orca families are again hunting in our Southern Ocean and wildlife tourism operator Naturaliste Charters are running daily charters to capture the raw energy and excitement of this unique natural phenomenon.
Every year between January and April, the remote habitat of Bremer Canyon located 30 miles off the coast of Bremer Bay puts on a marine spectacular unlike anywhere else on earth.
For those unsure of the significance of the area, go no further than the 2015 documentary Super Predator....


Hakai Magazine


There are 24 killer whales living in captivity in aquariums across North America, and approximately 30 more worldwide. For tourists and wide-eyed children, these captive whales are a wonder they may otherwise never see. But for a growing contingent of the public, concern for the whales’ well-being means that even one in captivity is too many. In response to this backlash and changing sense of morality, many aquariums are slowly phasing out their captive breeding programs and live shows, and are redesigning their whale enclosures. But environmental groups say it’s not enough.

Yet releasing the whales into the ocean is not an option. Some whales were captured from the wild, but many were born in tanks and have never seen the waves beyond the walls. The Whale Sanctuary Project believes it has a better solution


Science Daily


In movies and TV shows, dolphins are often portrayed as heroes who save humans through remarkable feats of strength and tenacity. Now dolphins could save the day for humans in real life, too -- with the help of emerging technology that can measure thousands of proteins and an improved database full of genetic data.

Magazine Submissions

the magazine accepts submissions of links to published articles and media of interest to our readers. we welcome original articles, letters, notices, photography, video and audio


SUBMIT
to the magazine





original material guidelines
notices: 100 words max.; letters & articles: 500 words max.
you or your organization must be authors of the work and are solely responsible for its content. the magazine gives no assurance material submitted will be published. media submission guidelines


DONATE
to the non profit wild ocean whale society

VOLUNTEER
review our volunteer opportunities

SUBMIT sightings
or call 1-877-323-9776 or eMail
we welcome your sighting reports, photographs, video and audio recordings. please review our media submission guidelines



Jump to:   MAP | SIGHTINGS | MAGAZINE


SUBSCRIBE
receive sightings update eMail notices

CONTACT
the wild ocean whale society